Edward Conze
The Large Sutra of Perfect Wisdom

University of California Press 1975


page 490
CHAPTER 61
NON EXTINCTION
THE COGNITIONS OF EXTINCTION AND OF NON-PRODUCTION

Thereupon the Ven. Subhati thought to himself:
Deep, to be sure, is this enlightenment of the Tathagatas. Let me question the Tathagata about it.
The Ven. Subhuti then said to the Lord: Inexhaustible, O Lord, is the perfection of wisdom.
The Lord: Because, like space, it cannot be extinguished.
Subhati: How should one aspire for the perfection of wisdom?
The Lord: Through the nonextinction of form, etc. to: of the knowledge of all modes, and furthermore through the space-like nonextinction of form, etc. to: of the knowledge of all modes. Moreover, through the space-like nonextinction of the karma formations, etc. to: through the space-like nonextinction of old age and death, of sorrow, lamentation, pain, sadness, and despair.
It is thus that the Bodhisattva, the great being, should aspire for the perfection of wisdom. This is the surveying of conditioned coproduction which avoids the extremes. To survey conditioned coproduction in such a manner, that is the special dharma of a Bodhisattva who is seated on the terrace of enlightenment. When he thus surveys conditioned coproduction, he will gain the cognition of the all-knowing.
A Bodhisattva who, coursing in perfect wisdom through this aspiration for space
should survey conditioned coprodoction through the aspiration for space-like nonextinction.
Persons who belong to the Bodhisattva vehicle,
and who yet turn away from full enlightenment do so because they have failed to resort to this skill in means. Those Bodhisattvas, great beings, however, who do not turn away from full enlightenment, do so because they all have resorted to this perfection of wisdom.
The Bodhisattva, the great being, who courses in skill in means and in the perfection of wisdom should through the aspiration for space-like nonextinction survey the perfection of wisdom and aspire to it. When he thus surveys conditioned coproduction, a Bodhisattva certainly does not see any dharma that is being produced without a cause, nor does he review a dharma that is permanent and never stopped.
He reviews no dharma as
a self, a being, a soul, a creature, a man, a youth, a person, a personality, a doer, one who feels, one who knows, one who sees; nor does he review a dharma as permanent or impermanent, as ease or ill, as self or notas appeased or not appeased. It is certainly thus that a Bodhisattva, a great being who courses in perfect wisdem, should survey conditioned coproduction.
At the time when the Bodhisattva courses in perfect
wisdom, he does not review form, etc. to: the knowledge of all modes, as permanent or impermanent, as ease or ill, as self or notor not appeased. He does not review the perfection of wisdom, etc. to: he does not review enlightenment, nor tbat dharma by which he would review enlightenment; nor does he review that dharma by which he would effect the forsaking of all residues of the defilements. It is thus that a Bodhisattva should course in the perfection of wisdom, without taking any dharma as a basis.

pg 501
P463 464 AA V 5
V 6. The Path of Development.
V6a. THE CROWNING ASSAULT.
And what, Subhuti, is of the Bodhisattva, the great being, the centration which is like the lion's yawn ?
Here, Subhuti, the Bodhisa detached from sense pleasures, detached from evil and unwholesome
dharmas, dwells in the attainment of the first trance, which is with thought adjusted and discursive, born of detachment, full of rapture and ease. So he dwells in all the trances up to the attainment of the cessation of feeling and perception.
Having emerged from the attainment of cessation' he enters into the attainment of the station of neither perception nor nonperception, and so (descending one by one) he enters the first trance.
Having made a classification of this concentration which is like the lion's yawn, he enters into the concentration which represents the crowning assault (samadhi).


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